lyssentome:

lisarighteye:

hopelessly-hope-ful:

jackekarashae:

*AGGRESSIVELY FORWARDS TO EVERY GUY I KNOW*

*TIME TRAVELS AND AGGRESSIVELY FORWARDS TO PAST SELF*

THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU

ALWAYS REBLOG!

👏👏👏👏👏

sexualthorientation:

i love how this starts out like he’s the quiet second son in daddy’s big chair, complete with the little tremor in his voice. then he stands up to full height and suddenly he’s all man-sized and his voice drops like two octaves to inform them that he is their king now and idk man i find it sexy as hell

theferociousroar:

This is a picture of Frederick G. Banting; in the words of the Library and Archives Canada, “one of the twentieth century’s most celebrated medical heroes”.
In the first world war, Dr. Banting served as a medical officer. He was awarded the Military Cross for continuing to treat war patients while he was wounded by a German shell.
After the war, he began to practise medicine and surgery in London, Ontario after finishing his training as an orthopedic surgeon. However, Banting was struggling — he had few patients, serious financial problems, and his girlfriend was threatening to leave him. To try and earn some more money, he got a $2/hour part-time job at the University of Western Ontario’s medical school. He even tried to paint in hopes of selling some to pay off his bills — but no one was interested.
One sleepless night on October 31, 1920, an idea suddenly occurred to this struggling doctor — if he could isolate the internal secretion of the pancreas, it could possibly treat diabetes! Dr. Banting travelled to Toronto to converse with J.J.R. Macleod - professor of physiology — about his idea, but Macleod wasn’t impressed. However, in May of the next year, Dr. Banting was given permission to proceed with his project. Dr. Banting and Macleod — and Macleod’s student research assistant Charles Best — started their work on May 17, 1921.
After hours of sweat and work, the insulin proved to be an efficacious and life-saving therapy for diabetes patients. Dr. Banting was now named Canada’s first Professor of Medical Research, and he became the most famous man in Canada by 1923.
——
I would say that Dr. Banting contributed to the “roar” of the 1920’s because of his discovery. He helped diabetic people everywhere, and this brought much happiness and fun to their lives — which is what the roar is all about.

theferociousroar:

This is a picture of Frederick G. Banting; in the words of the Library and Archives Canada, “one of the twentieth century’s most celebrated medical heroes”.

In the first world war, Dr. Banting served as a medical officer. He was awarded the Military Cross for continuing to treat war patients while he was wounded by a German shell.

After the war, he began to practise medicine and surgery in London, Ontario after finishing his training as an orthopedic surgeon. However, Banting was struggling — he had few patients, serious financial problems, and his girlfriend was threatening to leave him. To try and earn some more money, he got a $2/hour part-time job at the University of Western Ontario’s medical school. He even tried to paint in hopes of selling some to pay off his bills — but no one was interested.

One sleepless night on October 31, 1920, an idea suddenly occurred to this struggling doctor — if he could isolate the internal secretion of the pancreas, it could possibly treat diabetes! Dr. Banting travelled to Toronto to converse with J.J.R. Macleod - professor of physiology — about his idea, but Macleod wasn’t impressed. However, in May of the next year, Dr. Banting was given permission to proceed with his project. Dr. Banting and Macleod — and Macleod’s student research assistant Charles Best — started their work on May 17, 1921.

After hours of sweat and work, the insulin proved to be an efficacious and life-saving therapy for diabetes patients. Dr. Banting was now named Canada’s first Professor of Medical Research, and he became the most famous man in Canada by 1923.

——

I would say that Dr. Banting contributed to the “roar” of the 1920’s because of his discovery. He helped diabetic people everywhere, and this brought much happiness and fun to their lives — which is what the roar is all about.

triptone:

Last night my little sister (5th grade) was making an e-mail account

She saw gender and went to click female when she noticed the “other” choice

She looked at me confused and I started to explain that some people don’t think they fit in with strictly male or female

"Oh! You mean like transgender and stuff like that. I was freaked out for a second- I thought they meant robots."

Yet another example the kids are more open-minded than adults

sherokutakari:

dangerhamster:

blinkingkills:

thevoiceofbenedictcumberbatch:

the-vashta-natasha:

I think we need to invent a game called ‘shatner’

Someone yells ‘SHATNER’ at you and then you have to overact whatever you were doing

image

this is like the less dangerous version of infomercial

I played this in Uni the other day and the guy behind me flung himself off his chair and into the wall

"less dangerous"

thesulfurandthesea:

OH MY FUCKING GOD